A Bible Study Method

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Before moving from the Detroit are of Michigan to the Harrisburg area of Pennsylvania, I met with my accountability and study partner weekly for breakfast. Part of this time was dedicated to studying the Bible. We’d study throughout the week on our own and then get together and discuss the passage that we studied. On this page I’d like to share with you how I studied the passage between meetings and how I still study on my own. I use an 8-step plan that has gone through several revisions over the years. Currently it looks something like what’s outlined here.

In this plan, I usually complete 1 or more steps per day, though a couple of the steps will almost always take longer than 1 morning (as a morning person, my mind is most focused in the mornings, so that’s when I do my study). I start each day’s study by praying for clarity and focus. I also make sure I read the passage with its context at least daily.

By the way, this outline makes reference to the inductive study method, but it doesn’t go into a lot of detail on the ins and outs of the inductive study method. If you’re not familiar with that method, I highly recommend Debi Martin’s overview on it.

Step 1 – Read the passage several times, with context, in your favorite translation (mine is the ESV) and then in other translations as well.

Step 2 – Write down initial observations, any questions that come to mind, and a summary of the passage as a whole. Write out the typical inductive observations, things like questions, lists from the passage, cause and effect statements, etc. Do not bring in any outside sources yet; just observe the text.

Try to spend a lot of time on step 2. This step should span a couple of mornings. Only move past this step after you feel you’ve thoroughly explored the text, observed the text, asked questions of the text, and summarized the text.

Step 3 – Look up notes from your favorite study Bibles and commentaries. I like the NET Bible (excellent for translators’ notes), other study Bibles, and the Expositor’s Bible Commentary set. (Whatever sources you choose, don’t limit yourself to just 1 source.) These notes will often lead to other sources like Bible dictionaries, Josephus’ writings, and the writings of the early church fathers. This step will most likely span more than one morning.

Step 4 – Look up any parallel passages and make notes on how the parallel passages effect your understanding of the primary passage. Just remember that different authors wrote with different goals in mind.

Step 5 – From the insight gained from the steps 3 and 4, adjust your observations, answer your questions as much as possible, and make adjustments to your summary of the passage.

Step 6 – Prepare your notes for meeting with your accountability partner, including LFL (Lessons for Life) and other personal applications. Also prepare any maps or charts that might apply to the passage; these will be very helpful in your meeting.

Step 7 – Meet with your accountability partner to discuss the passage. During this meeting make notes of your partner’s observations and conclusions, and other things that come to your minds while you’re discussing the passage.

Step 8 – After the meeting, add the notes from that meeting to your notes, making any edits or adjustments to your notes from step 6.

Then start all over again with the next passage as you work your way through a book of the Bible at a time.

Here are a few final notes…

Limit the passage size to no longer than 15 verses when possible.
Try to limit the passage to 10-15 verses whenever possible. If it gets much longer than that, it’s harder to get through those steps in a week and it tends to be too much of a chunk to effectively study and discuss. Sometimes the passage has to be longer because there’s no clean place to break it up. Acts 13:13-41 is an example of that. It’s 29 verses altogether, but it’s all one piece with no place to break it up cleanly. So, we tackle it as a whole.

Context! You Must Remember the Context!
It’s also important to remember the textual context of the passage. Sometimes, when I have a block of time, I’ll sit down and read through the entire book or the major section of the book that contains the passage I’m studying, including at least several chapters. This keeps the greater context in mind when studying those 10- to 15-verse sections. With the exception of Psalms and Proverbs, the Bible book you’re studying is a single, coherent unit. Read it that way.

Let the text speak for itself.
Don’t try to force a viewpoint or meaning into the text. Let the text say what it says, and no more. A good rule of thumb I like to remember is: It can never mean what it never meant. Identify what the original author meant when writing to the original audience. What the author meant when he wrote it is what the passage means. Don’t embellish it or spiritualize it.

Accountability is the key to consistency!
I have found this method to be very helpful to me, but I think the most helpful part of the whole process is the accountability and fellowship of my friend. He’s going to be ready each week. I use that to motivate me to be as prepared as I can be, and that keeps me in the Word and in prayer every morning.

It’s my hope that this is helpful to you as you seek to more fully understand the Bible.

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Why Fortnite Is So Addictive

Do you play Fortnite? Are you a parent of someone who plays Fortnite? Would you say that you or your child is addicted to the game? Would you be surprised to learn that, according to the video below, the creators of Fortnite do not allow their children to play the game because of the addictive nature of it?

While I don’t play any video games at all because of the addictive and “time-wasting” nature of them, I know first hand the nature of addiction and how serious it can be. I hope this short video will be helpful to someone.

When God Moves

God is always moving, but sometimes he moves BIG and FAST! That’s been the case for my wife and me over the last 3+ months. Here’s is Debi’s writeup on it.

Sojourner Between Worlds

The last few months have been an amazing journey of watching God work and move in my husband and my lives. At the end of September 2018, we had no idea that our entire lives were about to be changed and turned upside down. In early October, my parents and sister, who live in Pennsylvania, had an urgent need that led to my coming to help them for a week. While with them and dealing with that particular crisis, both my parents and my sister asked us to consider moving near them to continue to help as other needs arose. At first thought, my husband and I were a bit taken aback as we were heavily involved in ministries at our church and in our jobs in Michigan. But as we prayed about it and looked at Scripture, we came to 1 Timothy 5:8 “But if anyone does not provide…

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Is Your Puzzler Sore? – A Quote

And the Grinch, with his Grinch-feet ice cold in the snow, stood puzzling and puzzling, how could it be so?

It came without ribbons. It came without tags. It came without packages, boxes or bags.

And he puzzled and puzzled ’till his puzzler was sore. Then the Grinch thought of something he hadn’t before.

What if Christmas, he thought, doesn’t come from a store. What if Christmas, perhaps, means a little bit more.

Dr. Seuss

By the way… Do you know what John 3:16 really means?

Jn316WhatLet’s look at a very familiar verse for a moment. It’s probably the most familiar verse in the Bible, but have you really thought about what it means?

John 3:16 – God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.

  • What God did (gave his only Son), he did out of love.
  • He gave his Son to die the death that we all deserve.
  • Those who believe in him will not perish but have eternal life.

Who does this include?

Well, it includes everyone! Those who believe will not perish. By necessary contrast, those who do not believe will perish. Easy enough, right?

Easy, but a bit terrifying. Let’s take a look at what is says just 2 verses later:

John 3:18 – Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God.

  • Anyone who believes in Jesus avoids condemnation.
  • Anyone who does not believe faces condemnation.

Is belief all it takes?

So, to avoid condemnation all you have to do is believe! That’s pretty easy for most. But what does it mean to believe in this context? Same passage, but a few verses later:

John 3:36 – Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life; whoever does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God remains on him.

  • Again, whoever believes has eternal life.
  • Whoever does not obey suffers the wrath of God.

The biblical term used here for “believe” is synonymous with “obey.” So, it’s not just an intellectual assent to the fact that Jesus exists, or even that Jesus died for sins; it’s belief with a view to obedience; it’s belief that results in obedience. Now we have a much more difficult proposition, don’t we?

This is where most people fall short, get tripped up, or simply choose to ignore what is very plain in Scripture.

How do we avoid this problem?

Jesus said that whoever would follow him (another way of saying “believe in him” or “obey him”) must leave everything else behind and follow him (i.e., seek to become like him, turning away from everything else).

Luke 9:23–26 – Jesus said to all, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will save it. For what does it profit a man if he gains the whole world and loses or forfeits himself? For whoever is ashamed of me and of my words, of him will the Son of Man be ashamed when he comes in his glory and the glory of the Father.”

These are very strict conditions, it seems to me. Only followers of Jesus, as defined here, will have the eternal life promised in John 3:16. It’s a lot different than just believing (assenting to a fact) that Jesus died for sins. If you are trusting your eternal destiny to the type of easy-believism that says all you have to do is say a prayer or ask Jesus into your heart, you are still under the wrath of the Father. And if you are under the wrath of the Father, you have no hope of being saved from it unless you turn your life over to Christ, forsaking all other beliefs and lifestyles.

You cannot continue in your own chosen way of life and expect that God is going to approve of you. God does not weigh your good deeds with your bad. He does not wink at your decisions to crusade for those things that are a violation of his Word and of his character. He does not grade on a scale. He does not yield to the demands of the current culture.

Are you a follower of Jesus?

So, what about you? Are you a follower of Jesus? I submit that this question is the most important question you will ever answer. Answer it honestly. Are you a follower of Jesus? If you answered “yes,” are you sure? If not, I implore you to be decisive today on this issue. You have no guarantee of having until tomorrow to make this decision.

“God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him. Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God. And this is the judgment: the light has come into the world, and people loved the darkness rather than the light because their works were evil. For everyone who does wicked things hates the light and does not come to the light, lest his works should be exposed. But whoever does what is true comes to the light, so that it may be clearly seen that his works have been carried out in God.”

— Jesus of Nazareth (John 3:16-21)

“His Wounds Have Paid My Ransom”

Below is a talk on a section of Matthew 26-28 that my wife gave to a ladies’ group a couple months ago at our church. She did a great job!


There is so much in this passage. It encompasses the gospel – Jesus’ death on our behalf, His resurrection, and His command to go and tell everyone this gospel. Where do I even start? I did think it was interesting that a missionary kid was given the passage with the Great Commission in it.

In one sense, this could be summed up pretty quickly: Jesus is Who He said He is – these chapters continually show how He has fulfilled the OT Scriptures that prophesied about the coming Messiah and Savior. He fulfills the reason that He came to earth as a human – to die a sinner’s death on our behalf, for the forgiveness of sins. Then being raised to life again, He has all authority and gives us the great task of proclaiming this gospel to all the world, with the promise of being with us through this daunting endeavor. In a nutshell, that’s what we have.

But I’d like to take a closer look at the crucifixion. Let’s read Matthew 27, starting in verse 24 and going through verse 56.

So when Pilate saw that he was gaining nothing, but rather that a riot was beginning, he took water and washed his hands before the crowd, saying, “I am innocent of this man’s blood; see to it yourselves.” And all the people answered, “His blood be on us and on our children!” Then he released for them Barabbas, and having scourged Jesus, delivered him to be crucified.

Then the soldiers of the governor took Jesus into the governor’s headquarters, and they gathered the whole battalion before him. And they stripped him and put a scarlet robe on him, and twisting together a crown of thorns, they put it on his head and put a reed in his right hand. And kneeling before him, they mocked him, saying, “Hail, King of the Jews!” And they spit on him and took the reed and struck him on the head. And when they had mocked him, they stripped him of the robe and put his own clothes on him and led him away to crucify him.

As they went out, they found a man of Cyrene, Simon by name. They compelled this man to carry his cross. And when they came to a place called Golgotha (which means Place of a Skull), they offered him wine to drink, mixed with gall, but when he tasted it, he would not drink it. And when they had crucified him, they divided his garments among them by casting lots. Then they sat down and kept watch over him there. And over his head they put the charge against him, which read, “This is Jesus, the King of the Jews.” Then two robbers were crucified with him, one on the right and one on the left. And those who passed by derided him, wagging their heads and saying, “You who would destroy the temple and rebuild it in three days, save yourself! If you are the Son of God, come down from the cross.” So also the chief priests, with the scribes and elders, mocked him, saying, “He saved others; he cannot save himself. He is the King of Israel; let him come down now from the cross, and we will believe in him. He trusts in God; let God deliver him now, if he desires him. For he said, ‘I am the Son of God.’” And the robbers who were crucified with him also reviled him in the same way.

Now from the sixth hour there was darkness over all the land until the ninth hour. And about the ninth hour Jesus cried out with a loud voice, saying, “Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?” that is, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” And some of the bystanders, hearing it, said, “This man is calling Elijah.” And one of them at once ran and took a sponge, filled it with sour wine, and put it on a reed and gave it to him to drink. But the others said, “Wait, let us see whether Elijah will come to save him.” And Jesus cried out again with a loud voice and yielded up his spirit.

And behold, the curtain of the temple was torn in two, from top to bottom. And the earth shook, and the rocks were split. The tombs also were opened. And many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised, and coming out of the tombs after his resurrection they went into the holy city and appeared to many. When the centurion and those who were with him, keeping watch over Jesus, saw the earthquake and what took place, they were filled with awe and said, “Truly this was the Son of God!”

There were also many women there, looking on from a distance, who had followed Jesus from Galilee, ministering to him, among whom were Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of James and Joseph and the mother of the sons of Zebedee.

So, let’s stop for a second. This is a familiar story to us. We are told it from the time we are children if we grow up in the church. We learn it as new believers and are reminded of it every Easter, which is coming up shortly. But don’t let the familiarity of the story blind you to what Jesus experienced here. Crucifixion was a horrific way for someone to die. Often beaten before being hung on a wooden beam, their back would have been torn and bloodied, rubbing up against rough wood. In order to breathe, they would have had to put all their weight onto their feet, which had nails going through it into the wood. The pain would have been excruciating. Usually crucifixion would take several days for someone to finally suffocate and die, which is why the other criminals had their legs broken, so they would not have been able to keep pulling themselves up to breathe and would have suffocated quickly.

A medical doctor, C. Truman Davis, writes from a medical perspective about what crucifixion was like. Here are some of his descriptions:

The legionnaire feels for the depression at the front of the wrist. He drives a heavy, square, wrought-iron nail through the wrist and deep into the wood. Quickly, he moves to the other side and repeats the action, being careful not to pull the arms too tightly, but to allow some flexion and movement….

The left foot is now pressed backward against the right foot, and with both feet extended, toes down, a nail is driven through the arch of each, leaving the knees moderately flexed. The Victim is now crucified. As He slowly sags down with more weight on the nails in the wrists, excruciating pain shoots along the fingers and up the arms to explode in the brain – the nails in the wrists are putting pressure on the median nerves.

As He pushes Himself upward to avoid this stretching torment, He places His full weight on the nail through His feet. Again there is the searing agony of the nail tearing through the nerves between the metatarsal bones of the feet. At this point, as the arms fatigue, great waves of cramps sweep over the muscles, knotting them in deep, relentless, throbbing pain. With these cramps comes the inability to push Himself upward. Hanging by his arms, the pectoral muscles are paralyzed and the intercostal muscles are unable to act. Air can be drawn into the lungs, but cannot be exhaled. Jesus fights to raise Himself in order to get even one short breath. Finally, carbon dioxide builds up in the lungs and in the blood stream and the cramps partially subside. Spasmodically, he is able to push Himself upward to exhale and bring in the life-giving oxygen…..

Jesus experienced hours of limitless pain, cycles of twisting, joint-rending cramps, intermittent partial asphyxiation, searing pain where tissue is torn from His lacerated back as He moves up and down against the rough timber. Then another agony begins — a terrible crushing pain deep in the chest as the pericardium slowly fills with serum and begins to compress the heart.

This is what Jesus went through. This is what He suffered for me and for you. And yet we so often doubt His love for us. How can I not trust Him if He was willing to go through all of that for me? How can I keep choosing to sin when my sin cost Him so much?

Jesus’ crucifixion was prophesied in the Old Testament and Matthew brings out many of the details to show how Jesus was fulfilling these prophecies.

Let’s read through Psalm 22 and see the many parallels with Jesus’ crucifixion.

My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?
Why are you so far from saving me, from the words of my groaning?
O my God, I cry by day, but you do not answer,
and by night, but I find no rest.

Yet you are holy,
enthroned on the praises of Israel.
In you our fathers trusted;
they trusted, and you delivered them.
To you they cried and were rescued;
in you they trusted and were not put to shame.

But I am a worm and not a man,
scorned by mankind and despised by the people.
All who see me mock me;
they make mouths at me; they wag their heads;
“He trusts in the LORD; let him deliver him;
let him rescue him, for he delights in him!”

Yet you are he who took me from the womb;
you made me trust you at my mother’s breasts.
On you was I cast from my birth,
and from my mother’s womb you have been my God.
Be not far from me,
for trouble is near,
and there is none to help.

Many bulls encompass me;
strong bulls of Bashan surround me;
they open wide their mouths at me,
like a ravening and roaring lion.

I am poured out like water,
and all my bones are out of joint;
my heart is like wax;
it is melted within my breast;
my strength is dried up like a potsherd,
and my tongue sticks to my jaws;
you lay me in the dust of death.

For dogs encompass me;
a company of evildoers encircles me;
they have pierced my hands and feet—
I can count all my bones—
they stare and gloat over me;
they divide my garments among them,
and for my clothing they cast lots.

But you, O LORD, do not be far off!
O you my help, come quickly to my aid!
Deliver my soul from the sword,
my precious life from the power of the dog!
Save me from the mouth of the lion!
You have rescued me from the horns of the wild oxen!

I will tell of your name to my brothers;
in the midst of the congregation I will praise you:
You who fear the LORD, praise him!
All you offspring of Jacob, glorify him,
and stand in awe of him, all you offspring of Israel!
For he has not despised or abhorred
the affliction of the afflicted,
and he has not hidden his face from him,
but has heard, when he cried to him.

From you comes my praise in the great congregation;
my vows I will perform before those who fear him.
The afflicted shall eat and be satisfied;
those who seek him shall praise the LORD!
May your hearts live forever!

All the ends of the earth shall remember
and turn to the LORD,
and all the families of the nations
shall worship before you.
For kingship belongs to the LORD,
and he rules over the nations.

All the prosperous of the earth eat and worship;
before him shall bow all who go down to the dust,
even the one who could not keep himself alive.
Posterity shall serve him;
it shall be told of the Lord to the coming generation;
they shall come and proclaim his righteousness to a people yet unborn,
that he has done it.

Isn’t that amazing? David, writing through the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, describes so much of what Jesus goes through. Even the mocking phrase of the chief priests, “He trusts in the LORD; let him deliver him;” is seen from Psalm 22.

When we read the different gospel accounts we can see what each writer included and didn’t include of Jesus’ final hours. Matthew doesn’t record Jesus’ final words. He tells us that Jesus cried out with a loud voice and yielded up His spirit. He did what He said He came to do – to lay down His life. No one could take it away from Him; He laid it down – He had the authority to do this.

Matthew tells us of the curtain being torn. This was huge – the curtain that separated the Most Holy part of the temple where the ark of the covenant was from the rest of the temple, protecting unholy people from being too close to a holy God. Can you imagine the shock of those who were at the temple and this huge curtain suddenly rips from top to bottom and the Most Holy place of the temple is exposed? Devout priests were probably panicking, thinking they were about to die for seeing what they weren’t supposed to see. Would they have quickly tried to repair it or cover it up?

And then, just as Jesus said He would, He rises from the dead. An angel tells the women who have gone to His tomb that He is going before them to Galilee and the disciples will see Him there. Matthew gives the account of the 11 disciples going to Galilee as Jesus directed. He doesn’t tell us how many days have passed or the other meetings Jesus has had with the disciples. Matthew’s focus is that Jesus has instructed the disciples to go to Galilee and He meets them there, to give them their final command before He goes into Heaven. And this also is familiar to us – “Go and make disciples”. But do we pay attention to what Jesus says right before this command? “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.” Because of this authority, they are thus to go and make disciples. Jesus concludes with the promise to be with them always. The command is bookended by Jesus’ reminder of His authority and His promise of His presence. Just as we see so often throughout the Bible, what is true (the indicative), Who God is, is given to us so that we are able to then follow the command (the imperative).

So, it may seem like this passage isn’t very practical. Yeah, I know, it’s about Jesus’ death and resurrection. And yeah, I know we’re supposed to go and make disciples, but I need something tangible to hang on to when I’m trying to reason with my 3 year old who keeps hitting his sister. Or how to make it through another day when the pain in my body is more than I can bear. But the reality is, ladies, that this passage is EVERYTHING! God Himself came down to earth in a human body, down amidst this broken and hurting world. He lived the perfect life that we just can’t do. Then he suffered what is probably one of the most horrific ways to die – to pay the penalty for OUR sins! Not His own – OURS! What kind of love is this? How could He do that – Why would He do that? That is a love that surpasses knowledge. And it wasn’t because we are all that. No, it was because of God’s mercy and grace and love. May this reminder of how great God’s love is, love enough to die, be an encouragement to you today.

That last refrain – “Why should I gain from His reward?” Why should we? We shouldn’t. “But this I know with all my heart, His wounds have paid my ransom.” And yours, if you have placed your faith in Jesus Christ. This was why Jesus came. We were in rebellion against God with no hope of saving ourselves. He came to pay the penalty of that rebellion and to reconcile us to God. He accomplished what He came to do. So, seeing this great sacrificial love that God has for us, how can we not tell everyone about Him? So go and boast of Jesus’ resurrection!

There is Hope, but Only One!

My friend and I have been studying 2 Corinthians and we just finished chapter 3 which contrasts ministry of the Old Covenant (the Mosaic Covenant, the Mosaic Law) with ministry of the New Covenant which was ushered in by Christ.

You can see the notes from that here, but I wanted to share some of the introductory and final notes from that study. I hope you’ll find it encouraging.


Thus far in chapter 3, Paul’s thought has progressed from the idea of commendatory letters written on hearts by Christ to reflection on the New Covenant promised by God through Jeremiah under which the law would be written on responsive human hearts.

Jer 31:31-34

“Behold, the days are coming, declares the LORD, when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and the house of Judah, not like the covenant that I made with their fathers on the day when I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt, my covenant that they broke, though I was their husband, declares the LORD. For this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, declares the LORD: I will put my law within them, and I will write it on their hearts. And I will be their God, and they shall be my people. And no longer shall each one teach his neighbor and each his brother, saying, ‘Know the LORD,’ for they shall all know me, from the least of them to the greatest, declares the LORD. For I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.”

In our passage today, Paul defends the apostolic ministry by comparing it to the ministry of the Old Covenant. He says that those who continue in the Old Covenant without embracing the New Covenant as revealed by the Spirit of God through Christ remain blind. This is because only through Christ is that blindness removed.

This is true not only of Jews but of all who have not turned to Christ for healing. A veil remains over their hearts; they cannot see the truth of the glory of Christ. As we’ll see next time, the god of this world, who is Satan, has blinded the minds of the unbelievers, to keep them from seeing the light of the Gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God.

If Christ doesn’t return first, every person alive will die and find themselves face to face with the Judge of the universe to give an account of their lives and to receive judgment. All sin will be judged! The question before that future court will be ‘Who will be judged for your sin?’ and there are only two options: you or Jesus.

Jesus lived the perfect life that we could not live and then died, taking the judgment for the sins of all who will place their trust, hope, and faith in Him. Those who do not turn to Christ and the New Covenant that he ushered in will be judged for their own sin; that judgment is an eternity of conscious suffering apart from God. Those who do turn away from their sin and give their lives over to Christ, placing themselves under His rule, will experience a very different future. Jesus took the judgment for them onto himself on the Cross of Calvary. So for those who have turned to Christ in faith, placing their hope and trust in Christ will spend eternity face to face with the Lord in a loving relationship with him.

The Old Covenant, the Mosaic Law as outlined in the OT, was a glorious covenant because it reflected the character of God. Psalm 19 tells us this very plainly.

Ps 19:7–9

The law of the LORD is perfect, reviving the soul;
the testimony of the LORD is sure, making wise the simple;
the precepts of the LORD are right, rejoicing the heart;
the commandment of the LORD is pure, enlightening the eyes;
the fear of the LORD is clean, enduring forever;
the rules of the LORD are true, and righteous altogether.

See also all of Psalm 119.

So, this covenant came with glory, as we learned in today’s passage. The problem is that it places us all in a very bad spot. It’s easy to see that this Old Covenant was good and righteous, but it gives no power to those under it to obey it. This covenant says that if we fail to obey it all we will suffer the condemnation in it. Everyone failed to obey it; no one experienced its ultimate blessings, so it was broken.

Jesus lived out the Old Covenant perfectly, fulfilled its mandates, and then also took its condemnation on behalf of all who would turn to him as payment on their behalf. This ushered in a New Covenant that grants power to those under it. They are given the Spirit of God to dwell with each of them to grant them the power to obey the mandates of this New Covenant as outlined in the NT. Those who will place themselves under this New Covenant will experience its blessings.

So, the primary takeaway from this passage today is actually the most important question you will ever be forced to answer: Who will be judged for your sin, for your crimes against God? Are you under the New Covenant? If not, or if you’re not sure, you can be. Here’s how: https://geojono.wordpress.com/be-decisive/

Heb 13:20-21

May the God of peace who brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, the great shepherd of the sheep, by the blood of the eternal covenant, equip you with everything good that you may do his will, working in us that which is pleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ, to whom be glory forever and ever. Amen.